Filing for Disability in Florida

Filing for Disability in Florida

| Dec 16, 2019 | Disability Law |

It can be a tough choice to choose to file for disability in the state of Florida. You may have worked hard your entire life, and acknowledging that you are in need of Social Security Disability (SSDI) can be extremely difficult. However, there’s no need to feel bad about this decision. In fact, about a quarter of all working adults in America will unfortunately be forced to make this decision prior to retiring. Living life isn’t always a safe, accident-free experience and many people develop chronic and serious health conditions through no fault of their own.

The US Social Security system was instituted in the 1930s in order to address health challenges of the public. Throughout the decades, additional benefits and services have been added to the program in order to assist those who are in need in attaining a reasonable quality of life without putting undue financial burdens on them or their families. If you have recently been disabled in the state of Florida, then there are certain things that you should be informed about in order to know if you qualify for disability in Florida, as well as about how to apply for benefits if you do quality. While the Social Security Administration (SSA) in 2018 received more than 20 million applications, but only 35 percent of them were awarded benefits. Knowing how these applications are evaluated and how the process functions is key to having your claim approved. Here are some things to keep in mind before you apply for disability in Florida:

  • Are You Working- The SSA is very strict when it comes to defining work for disability benefits. If you are able to perform work, or “substantial gainful activity,” despite your disability or will be able to resume work within the year, then you will not be eligible for SSDI. Substantial gainful activity, or SGA is defined as any work with monthly income more than $1220 in 2019.
  • The Severity of Your Condition- In order to qualify for social security,  your condition must interfere with basic work-related activities. This is typically defined as any combination of impairments that prevents somebody from engaging in the above definition of gainful activity. Such impairments can be either mental or physical, and need to be proven with medical records and workers’ compensation claims.
  • If Your Condition Is Considered Disabling- This may be difficult to determine without the help of a disability advocate. According to the SSA, “For each of the major body systems, we maintain a list of medical conditions that are so severe they automatically mean that you are disabled. If your condition is not on the list, we have to decide if it is of equal severity to a medical condition that is on the list.”
  • Can you Do Your Previous Job- The SSA needs to figure out if your condition interferes with your ability to the work that you were employed at previously. If not, then your claim will be denied.
  • Are You Able To Do Any Other Work- If you are not able to do when you did in the past, then the SSA will see if you are able to adjust to other work. They consider your medical conditions and your age, education, and past work experience as well as any other transferable skills you may have when considering your claim.

When you are filing for disability in Florida, you may need assistance. Call Olsen Law Firm today for an appointment regarding any legal assistance when filing for disability.